Relationship between fugitive slave act uncle toms cabin and the underground railroad

Uncle Tom's Cabin - Ohio History Central

relationship between fugitive slave act uncle toms cabin and the underground railroad

The novel Uncle Tom's Cabin indirectly helped to start the Civil War by For instance, Stowe was appalled by the Fugitive Slave Act which had. Anti-Tom literature refers to the 19th century pro-slavery novels and other literary works written in response to Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin. 4 Selected anti-Tom novels; 5 See also; 6 References; 7 External links on the evils of slavery and was inspired by the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act two years. Harriet Tubman- former slave (Underground Railroad), and Harriet Beecher Stowe authored Uncle Tom's Cabin in in response to the Fugitive Slave Act.

However, he has two visions, one of Jesus and one of Eva, which renew his resolve to remain a faithful Christian, even unto death. He encourages Cassy to escape, which she does, taking Emmeline with her. As Tom is dying, he forgives the overseers who savagely beat him.

Humbled by the character of the man they have killed, both men become Christians.

relationship between fugitive slave act uncle toms cabin and the underground railroad

Very shortly before Tom's death, George Shelby Arthur Shelby's son arrives to buy Tom's freedom but finds he is too late. Final section On their boat ride to freedom, Cassy and Emmeline meet George Harris' sister and accompany her to Canada. Cassy discovers that Eliza is her long-lost daughter who was sold as a child. Now that their family is together again, they travel to France and eventually Liberiathe African nation created for former American slaves.

George Shelby returns to the Kentucky farm and frees all his slaves. George tells them to remember Tom's sacrifice and his belief in the true meaning of Christianity. Major characters Main article: Uncle Tom, the title character, was initially seen as a noble, long-suffering Christian slave. In more recent years, however, his name has become an epithet directed towards African-Americans who are accused of selling out to whites.

Anti-Tom literature - Wikipedia

Stowe intended Tom to be a "noble hero" [28] and praiseworthy person. Throughout the book, far from allowing himself to be exploited, Tom stands up for his beliefs and is grudgingly admired even by his enemies. Eliza Eliza is a slave and personal maid to Mrs.

Shelby who escapes to the North with her five-year-old son Harry after he is sold to Mr. According to Rankin, in February a young slave woman, Eliza Harris, had escaped across the frozen Ohio River to the town of Ripley with her child in her arms and stayed at his house on her way further north. Clare is the daughter of Augustine St.

Eva enters the narrative when Uncle Tom is traveling via steamship to New Orleans to be sold, and he rescues the five- or six-year-old girl from drowning. Eva begs her father to buy Tom, and he becomes the head coachman at the St.

He spends most of his time with the angelic Eva. Eva often talks about love and forgiveness, convincing the dour slave girl Topsy that she deserves love. She even touches the heart of her Aunt Ophelia. Eventually Eva falls terminally ill. Before dying, she gives a lock of her hair to each of the slaves, telling them that they must become Christians so that they may see each other in Heaven.

On her deathbed, she convinces her father to free Tom, but because of circumstances the promise never materializes. A similar character, also named Little Eva, later appeared in the children's novel Little Eva: The Flower of the South by Philip J.

Anti-Tom literature

Cozans—although this ironically was an anti-Tom novel. He is arguably the novel's main antagonist. His goal is to demoralize Tom and break him of his religious faith; he eventually orders Tom whipped to death out of frustration for his slave's unbreakable belief in God.

The novel reveals that, as a young man, he had abandoned his sickly mother for a life at sea and ignored her letter to see her one last time at her deathbed. He sexually exploits Cassy, who despises him, and later sets his designs on Emmeline. It is unclear if Legree is based on any actual individuals.

Reports surfaced after the s that Stowe had in mind a wealthy cotton and sugar plantation owner named Meredith Calhounwho settled on the Red River north of Alexandria, Louisiana. Generally, however, the personal characteristics of Calhoun "highly educated and refined" do not match the uncouthness and brutality of Legree. Calhoun even edited his own newspaper, published in Colfax originally "Calhoun's Landing"which was renamed The National Democrat after Calhoun's death.

However, Calhoun's overseers may have been in line with the hated Legree's methods and motivations.

Story of Us Fugitive Slave Act and Uncle Tom's Cabin

Arthur Shelby — Tom's master in Kentucky. Shelby is characterized as a "kind" slaveowner and a stereotypical Southern gentleman. Emily Shelby — Arthur Shelby's wife. She is a deeply religious woman who strives to be a kind and moral influence upon her slaves and is appalled when her husband sells his slaves with a slave trader.

As a woman, she has no legal way to stop this, as all property belongs to her husband. Chloe — Tom's wife and mother of his children. Clare — Tom's third owner and father of Eva.

Clare is complex, often sarcastic, with a ready wit. After a rocky courtship he marries a woman he grows to hold in contempt, though he is too polite to let it show. Clare recognizes the evil in chattel slavery but is not willing to relinquish the wealth it brings him.

After his daughter's death he becomes more sincere in his religious thoughts and starts to read the Bible to Tom.

relationship between fugitive slave act uncle toms cabin and the underground railroad

He plans on finally taking action against slavery by freeing his slaves, but his good intentions ultimately come to nothing. Clare — Wife of Augustine, she is a self-absorbed woman without a hint of compassion for those around her, including her own family. Given to an unending list of apparently imaginary physical maladies, she continually complains about the lack of sympathy she is receiving. She has separated her personal maid, Mammy, from her own two children because they would interfere with her duties.

As Marie drives Mammy to exhaustion, she criticizes her for selfishly seeking to attend her own family. Upon the unexpected death of Augustine, Marie countermands the legal process that would have given Tom his freedom. George Harris — Eliza's husband.

An intelligent and clever half-white slave who is fiercely loyal to his family. When asked if she knows who made her, she professes ignorance of both God and a mother, saying "I s'pect I growed.

relationship between fugitive slave act uncle toms cabin and the underground railroad

Don't think nobody never made me. During the early-to-mid 20th century, several doll manufacturers created Topsy and Topsy-type dolls. The phrase "growed like Topsy" later "grew like Topsy" passed into the English language, originally with the specific meaning of unplanned growth, later sometimes just meaning enormous growth.

Clare's pious, hard-working, abolitionist cousin from Vermont. She displays the ambiguities towards African-Americans felt by many Northerners at the time. She argues against the institution of slavery yet, at least initially, feels repulsed by the slaves as individuals.

Prue — A depressed slave who was forced to let her child starve to death. She takes up drinking in her misery, and is ultimately beaten and killed for it. Quimbo and Sambo — slaves of Simon Legree who act as overseers of the plantation. On orders from Legree, they savagely whip Tom but afterward tearfully repent of their deeds to Tom, who forgives them as he lies dying.

Major themes "The fugitives are safe in a free land. Smyth after they escape to freedom. Uncle Tom's Cabin is dominated by a single theme: Stowe sometimes changed the story's voice so she could give a " homily " on the destructive nature of slavery [33] such as when a white woman on the steamboat carrying Tom further south states, "The most dreadful part of slavery, to my mind, is its outrages of feelings and affections—the separating of families, for example.

Stowe made it somewhat subtle and in some cases she weaved it into events that would also support the dominant theme. One example of this is when Augustine St. Clare is killed, he attempted to stop a brawl between two inebriated men in a cafe and was stabbed. One other example is the death of the slave woman Prue who was whipped to death for being drunk on a consistent basis; however, her reasons for doing so is due to the loss of her baby.

In the opening of the novel, the fates of Eliza and her son are being discussed between slave owners over wine. Considering that Stowe intended this to be a subtheme, this scene could foreshadow future events that put alcohol in a bad light.

Because Stowe saw motherhood as the "ethical and structural model for all of American life" [36] and also believed that only women had the moral authority to save [37] the United States from the demon of slavery, another major theme of Uncle Tom's Cabin is the moral power and sanctity of women.

Through characters like Eliza, who escapes from slavery to save her young son and eventually reunites her entire familyor Eva, who is seen as the "ideal Christian", [38] Stowe shows how she believed women could save those around them from even the worst injustices. Clare to "look away to Jesus" after the death of St. Clare's beloved daughter Eva. These genres were the most popular novels of Stowe's time and tended to feature female main characters and a writing style which evoked a reader's sympathy and emotion.

Georgiana May, a friend of Stowe's, wrote a letter to the author, saying: I could not leave it any more than I could have left a dying child. Whicher called Uncle Tom's Cabin " Sunday-school fiction", full of "broadly conceived melodrama, humor, and pathos. Some people, like Abraham Lincoln, at least early in his political career, just wanted slavery to stay where it was, and those were what we would call free-soilers, or anti-slavery advocates.

They said, "Alright, we can't get rid of slavery "in the South. They said that slavery should be ended today everywhere in the United States and the world, and that it is an immoral, un-Christian institution. So these Western territories were a really big part of the increasing tension over the institution of slavery in the s.

relationship between fugitive slave act uncle toms cabin and the underground railroad

So inthe United States won the Mexican-American War and they got a whole bunch of new territory that had once been Mexico, and these will become the states of Texas, and Oklahoma, and many of the sort of Midwestern states we have today, but this now threatened the balance of power between those slave-holding states in US Congress and those that were free states, so now everyone is wondering is slavery going to spread to the West? Should slavery spread to the West? So the Compromise of happened right here inlaughter and the Compromise ofI like to think of it kind of like a band-aid over this sectional tension, so I'll draw you guys a little band-aid.

So why was it a big win? So this meant that any time that someone who was enslaved in the South made a run for the North, a run for Canada as many of the enslaved people did, anyone in the North might be drafted to help return that person to the South.

So Stowe lived on a stop in the Underground Railroad, and that was this passageway for Southern slaves to get to the North, and Stowe and her husband actually helped a lot of runaway slaves.